Lamberto Zollo, University of Florence (DISEI - Department of Economics and Management), Via delle Pandete 32, 50127, Florence (Italy); e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Riccardo Rialt, Zollo, University of Florence (DISEI - Department of Economics and Management), Via delle Pandete 32, 50127, Florence (Italy); e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Cristano Ciappei, University of Florence, University of Florence (DISEI - Department of Economics and Management), Via delle Pandete 32, 50127, Florence (Italy); e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Andrea Boccardi, University of Florence, , University of Florence (DISEI - Department of Economics and Management), Via delle Pandete 32, 50127, Florence (Italy); e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Abstract

Social entrepreneurship is one of the most discussed issues in recent management literature. In partcular, social entrepreneurship has recently gained the atenton of management scholars interested in understanding its sociological and anthropological aspects. This paper focuses on Claude Lévi-Strauss’s noton of “bricolage” and the way it can represent a signifcant opportunity to address emergent social needs. Building on a postmodernist philosophical perspectve, namely Jacques Derrida’s “deconstructonism,” we atempt to unpack the bricolage phenomenon within the social entrepreneurship feld. Following the fndings of an in-depth longitudinal case study, we provide a theoretcal conceptualizaton of possible entrepreneurial solutons to social needs, exploring the signifcant role of bricolage that is consequently interpreted as a suitable entrepreneurial opportunity to address partcular types of social needs that we shall defne, in a way, as emergent.

Keywords: social entrepreneurship, bricolage, non-proft organizatons, deconstructonism, complexity, emergencies management.